TESTING DEHYDRATED FOODS FOR ENZYMATIC ACTIVITY
Prior to the Raw Foods Festival in 2002, Excalibur conducted two experiments to determine at what temperatures enzymes become deactivated.

TEST 1: Three samples of rye crackers were prepared in an Excalibur Dehydrator and dried at different temperature settings. After drying, all three samples were identical in appearance.

Sample 1: dried at 105F dial setting.
Sample 2: dried at 125F dial setting.
Sample 3: dried at 145F dial setting.

When mixed with the rice batter, the results of all three samples were equal. However, even though Sample 1 was high in enzyme activity, it went sour during the drying process because it took longer to dry than Sample 2 and Sample 3.

TEST 2: Three samples of raw veggie burgers. We used veggie burgers because of their high concentration of enzyme peroxidase.

Sample 1: dried at 105F dial setting.
Sample 2: dried at 125F dial setting.
Sample 3: dried at 145F dial setting.

Again, all three samples provided identical results after rehydrating in the hydrogen peroxide solution.

Test 1: Measure Enzymatic Activity (Created by Viktoras Kulvinskas) uses the digestive enzyme amylase to convert a starch mixture to maltose.
  1. Sprout rye for about 60 hours. Blend 2 cups of sprouted rye with 1 cup water, to pancake batter consistency. Spread on Excalibur Paraflexx sheet. Dehydrate to a cracker.
  2. Blend 2 cups of cooked rice, with warm water. Temperature should be less than 105°F. Blend to pancake batter consistency.
  3. Taste both the rye crackers and the rice batter. Neither of them should taste sweet.
  4. Take 1/2 cup of ground rye cracker, and blend into the 105°F rice batter.
  5. Sit at room temperature for at least 20 minutes. Taste the batter. If the batter tastes sweet then the enzymes are active. The amylase enzymes within the sprouted rye crackers will have converted the rice starch into sweet maltose. Therefore, the enzymes were not destroyed in the dehydration process.
Test 2: Peroxidase Enzyme (Recommended by Dr. John Whitaker, world known enzymologist and former Dean of Nutrition and Food Science Department at UC Davis). This test uses the enzyme peroxidase (found in plant foods) to catalyze the transfer of electrons from hydrogen peroxide to a colorimetric indicator. Peroxidase is an indicator enzyme frequently used by laboratories to measure enzymatic activity when freezing, blanching, and heat-treating vegetables.
  1. Dehydrate a batch of veggie burgers. Veggie burgers are made with various plant foods and contain a high level of peroxidase.
  2. Place a fully dehydrated veggie burger in 8 oz. of 3% hydrogen peroxide solution. Rehydrate for several hours.
  3. After at least 2 hours, filter out the soluble using a fine strainer. A nylon or paper towel will work well if you don't have a strainer.
  4. Check the color of the hydrogen peroxide solution. If the peroxidase enzymes are active they will catalyze a chemical reaction with the hydrogen peroxide and turn it to a brown color. This will show that the enzymes were not destroyed in the dehydration process.